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The 4x10

 

 

The Back of the 4x10 Camera

This is a Traditional 4x10 field camera built by Keith Canham (K.B. Canham Cameras Inc.) of Mesa, AZ.  It is made of walnut and anondized aluminum. 

The grid lines on the back (aka. "ground glass") aid in composing; insuring that we have a level horizon.  Because there is no mirror between the camera back and the lens, the image that is projected on the back is upside-down and backwards. 

http://www.canhamcameras.com/

 

 

The Front of the 4x10 Camera

The most prominent features are the bellows and lens.

The bellows are either leather or synthetic (in this case, they are synthetic) and allow the photographer to focus the camera by changing the distance between lens and camera back. 

The lens - a Rodenstock APO-Sironar-N 300mm/5.6 - is a nice standard view lens that weighs about 2.25 lbs.  Its view is roughly equivalent to a 42mm lens in 35mm format. 

Achieving a good focus can be a bit tricky.  Imagine standing behind the camera, under a darkcloth, holding a focusing loupe (magnifier) in your left hand, with your eye pressed up against the back of the loupe and the loupe pressed up against the camera back.  Meanwhile, your right hand is making fine adjustments in focus by turning the knobs on the bottom right side of the camera.  As soon as you "dial it in", you drop the loupe, allowing it to dangle from a cord around your neck while your left hand fumbles for the focus locking mechanisms on the left side of the camera base.  And remember, you can't see anything that your hands are doing because your head is still buried under the darkcloth.   

http://www.rodenstock-photo.com/

 

 

The 4x10 Camera on the tripod

Obviously, this is not a handheld camera.

Here, the camera rests on an Arca-Swiss ball head which, in turn, sits atop a wooden Ries tripod. 

 http://www.riestripod.com/

The 4x5

 

 

The Back of the 4x5 Camera

This is a Traditional 4x5 field camera built by Ebony Cameras.  It is made of ebony wood and titanium. 

The grid lines on the back (aka. "ground glass") aid in composing; insuring that we have a level horizon.  Because there is no mirror between the camera back and the lens, the image that is projected on the back is upside-down and backwards. 

 

 

The Front of the 4x5 Camera

The most prominent features are the bellows and lens.

The bellows are either leather or synthetic (in this case, they are leather) and allow the photographer to focus the camera by changing the distance between lens and camera back. 

The lens - a Rodenstock APO-Sironar-S 210mm/5.6 - is a nice standard view lens that weighs about 1.08 lbs.  Its view is roughly equivalent to a 53mm lens in 35mm format. 

Achieving a good focus can be a bit tricky.  Imagine standing behind the camera, under a darkcloth, holding a focusing loupe (magnifier) in your left hand, with your eye pressed up against the back of the loupe and the loupe pressed up against the camera back.  Meanwhile, your right hand is making fine adjustments in focus by turning the knobs on the bottom right side of the camera.  As soon as you "dial it in", you drop the loupe, allowing it to dangle from a cord around your neck while your left hand fumbles for the focus locking mechanisms on the left side of the camera base.  And remember, you can't see anything that your hands are doing because your head is still buried under the darkcloth.   

http://www.rodenstock-photo.com/

 

 

The 4x5 Camera on the tripod

Obviously, this is not a handheld camera.

Here, the camera rests on an Arca-Swiss ball head which, in turn, sits atop a carbon fiber Gitzo tripod. 

Large format accessories for both 4x5 & 4x10

In addition to camera and tripod, a few accessories are required.

First, on the far left, the black cylinder is a 3x loupe.  Used in focusing, you hold the loupe against the back of the camera while adjusting focus with your opposite hand.

Second, the white device in the middle is a light meter.  As the name suggests, it is critical to reading the light and determining correct exposure.

Third, on the far right is a film holder.  Each holder secures two pieces of film (two exposures).  Once the proper exposure is determined, the lens is closed, the film holder is placed in the back of the camera, and the darkslide that protects the film is removed.  Then, the shutter is released and the image is made.

Finally, under all this is a black darkcloth.  Working under the darkcloth during focusing allows you to better see the image projected on the camera back.

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The Wilderness Gallery, LLC
Upper Arlington, OH  43221
Phone: 614-565-9821
Email:
cwbanfield@thewildernessgallery.com